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HANDS UP DANCE MUSIC



"Mixes By DJ Sneaky Pete"
 

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"About DJ Sneaky Pete"

Back by popular demand Dj Sneaky Pete has been called out of retirement and now playing “The Music Of The Future”… the best Electronic Dance Music ever produced, specializing in House Music and various sub-genres of EDM such as, Big Room, Progressive, Bounce, Electro, Breaks, and Future Bass. Sneaky Pete is currently the resident DJ at The Dance Dome in Palm City FL.

Initially, electronic dance music was associated with European rave and club culture. It achieved limited popular exposure in America but by the mid-to-late 1990s efforts were underway to market a range of dance genres using the label "electronica." At the time, a wave of electronic music bands from the UK, including The Prodigy, The Chemical Brothers, Fatboy Slim and Underworld, had been prematurely associated with an "American electronica revolution". But rather than finding mainstream success, many established EDM acts were relegated to the margins of the US industry. In 1998 Madonna's Ray of Light brought the genre to the attention of popular music listeners. Despite US media interest in electronica in the late 1990s, American house and techno producers continued to travel abroad to establish their careers as DJs and producers. Other new names began to gain prominence at the turn of the century, such as Dutch producer Tiësto, who received worldwide attention after providing a soundtrack to the entry of athletes during the opening ceremony of the 2004 Summer Olympics—which The Guardian newspaper deemed one of the 50 most important events in dance music.

By the mid-2000s the prominence of dance music in North American popular culture had markedly increased. According to Spin, Daft Punk's performance at Coachella in 2006 was the "tipping point" for EDM—it introduced the duo to a new generation of "rock kids". As noted by Entertainment Weekly, Justin Timberlake's "SexyBack" helped introduce EDM sounds to top 40 radio, as it brought together variations of electronic dance music with the singer’s R&B sounds. In 2009, French house musician David Guetta began to gain prominence in mainstream pop music thanks to several crossover hits on Top 40 charts such as "When Love Takes Over", as well as his collaborations with U.S. pop and hip-hop acts such as Akon ("Sexy Bitch") and The Black Eyed Peas ("I Gotta Feeling"). YouTube and SoundCloud helped fuel interest in EDM, as well as electro house and dubstep. Skrillex popularized a harsher sound nicknamed "brostep", or dubstep.

The increased popularity of EDM was also influenced by live events and gigs. Promoters and venues realized that DJs could generate larger profits than traditional musicians; Diplo explained that "a band plays [for] 45 minutes; DJs can play for four hours. Rock bands—there's a few headliner dudes that can play 3,000-4,000-capacity venues, but DJs play the same venues, they turn the crowd over two times, people buy drinks all night long at higher prices—it's a win-win." Electronic music festivals like the Electric Daisy Carnival (EDC) and Ultra Music Festival also grew in size, placing an increased emphasis on visual experiences, and the DJs themselves, who began to attain a celebrity status. Other major acts that gained prominence like Avicii and Swedish House Mafia held concert tours at major music venues like arenas rather than nightclubs; in December 2011, Swedish House Mafia became the first electronic music act to sell out New York City's Madison Square Garden.

In 2011 Spin declared a "new rave generation" led by acts like David Guetta, Deadmau5, and Skrillex. In January 2013, Billboard introduced a new EDM-focused Dance/Electronic Songs chart, tracking the top 50 electronic songs based on sales, radio airplay, club play, and online streaming. According to Eventbrite, EDM fans are more likely to use social media to discover and share events or gigs. They also discovered that 78% of fans say they are more likely to attend an event if their peers do, compared to 43% of fans in general. EDM has many young and social fans. By late 2011, Music Trades was describing electronic dance music as the fastest-growing genre in the world. Elements of electronic music also became increasingly prominent in pop music. Radio and television also contributed to dance music's mainstream acceptance.

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